• Thank you for visiting the Cafe Rad Lab Forum
  • We present & discuss radiation health, science & news
  • To keep you informed about vital nuke information.
Hello There, Guest! Login Register


Everything Breaks Eventually
#1
As long as there are nuclear bombs, power plants and other devices, there will be breakdowns and accidents and consequent poisoning of the life on earth.  The earth is a sacrifice zone for the nuclear industries.  

As of 2014, there have been more than 100 serious nuclear accidents and incidents from the use of nuclear power
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_an..._incidents

The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has concluded that technical innovation cannot eliminate the risk of human errors in nuclear plant operation.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_nu...by_country
 
Reply
#2
Nuclear has ruined your children's future.

Catastrophic nuclear accidents such as the core meltdowns in Chernobyl and Fukushima are more likely to happen than previously assumed.Such events may occur once every 10 to 20 years — some 200 times more often than estimated in the past.

 half of the radioactive caesium-137 would be spread over an area of more than 1,000 kilometres away from the nuclear reactor. Western Europe is likely to be contaminated about once in 50 years by more than 40 kilobecquerel of caesium-137 per square meter.

If a single nuclear meltdown were to occur in Western Europe, around 28 million people on average would be affected by contamination of more than 40 kilobecquerels per square meter.  A major nuclear accident in southern Asia would affect around 34 million people,

Probability of contamination from severe nuclear reactor accidents is higher than expected: study
https://phys.org/news/2012-05-probabilit...actor.html
 
Reply
#3
[Image: thechernobyl.jpg]

The nightmare of mans radioactive endeavours.  We must contain the first failing containment hoping to secure the safety of countries, until the time our descendants will have to deal with the deadly materials again.

Chernobyl's new sarcophagus took two decades to make. Bigger than Wembley Stadium and taller than the Statue of Liberty, it will contain the Chernobyl disaster site for 100 years. It required an unprecedented level of international cooperation.   More large nuclear accidents are now expected to occur every few decades.

short video
https://www.washingtonpost.com/videonati...video.html

longer video
https://youtu.be/mdnutU2m71o
 
Reply
#4
Somber art, Code.

The Korea Times
   
Fukushima Beach Opens for Visitors

http://koreatimes.co.kr/www/world/2019/0...72600.html
 
Reply
#5
Fukushima Beach is open...but 1000 times more harmful then they think

"Results from Chernobyl studies clearly demonstrate that the current genetic risk factor is in error by ~1000-fold, and that the dose–response is not linear. There are significant increases in major congenital malformations in offspring of those exposed to internal doses <1 mSv "

https://www.genetics.org/content/204/4/1627
 
Reply
#6
From the link: The LSS populations, like the nuclear workers, lived on the contaminated sites of the bombed towns for many years after the bomb. Contamination was a consequence of the black rain (Abdale et al. 2016). The updraft from the rising fireball at Hiroshima and Nagasaki sucked in moist maritime air, which cooled with altitude and condensed on the 95% unfissioned uranium nanoparticles created in the plasma. This produced black rain over an area that included all of the dose groups used for the LSS study, for which dose was calculated by distance from the hypocenter. Uranium was measured later in the contaminated areas (Takada et al. 1983). The existence of any fallout was denied, and external acute doses were calculated based on distance using data from experiments carried out in the Nevada desert. The last 20 years has seen changes in the understanding of the biological effects of radiation. This includes realization that for internal exposures to elements that have chemical affinity for DNA, and to nanoparticles, the concept of absorbed dose is worthless (CERRIE 2004). Uranium has a high affinity for DNA and a large number of studies have now shown effects that define large errors in the “dose” based approach (Busby 2015). The European Union has recently funded research on this issue (Laurent et al. 2016).
 
Reply
  


Forum Jump:


Browsing: 1 Guest(s)