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Radioactive heavy metal poisoning
#1
When I started researching how bad the Fukushima Dai-Ichi meltdowns were, the thing I noticed time and again was that radiation hazards were officially being minimized and that the damage control efforts to protect the nuclear cartel from bearing responsibility for any harm done were rather obvious.  

16 US Ships That Aided Japan Still Contaminated With Radiation
http://www.military.com/daily-news/2016/..._160316.nl

Quote:Experts differ on the effects of radiation in general and, specifically, for those involved in Operation Tomodachi.

Experts would differ when all the different radioactive heavy metals and gaseous fission products have different characteristics and decay chains, some more toxic than others, but then they lump them all together into one unit of measure to use for risk assessment. Nuclear experts use the argument that if an external dose of radiation doesn't kill you immediately then no harm was done and base their judgments on inadequate studies of the survivors of the Nagasaki and Hiroshima atomic bombings.  Relying on limited studies of a single high level external radiation exposure; any long term low level exposure effects can be extrapolated away.  By focusing only on the immediate radiation hazard the long term chemical toxicity of the radioactive heavy metal poisoning is ignored even though the long term health effects of heavy metal poisoning, especially mercury and lead, are well documented.  The use of depleted uranium, DU, has provided some information on the toxicity of a radioactive heavy metal.  

Teratogenicity of depleted uranium aerosols: A review from an epidemiological perspective
Rita Hindin, Doug Brugge, and Bindu Panikkar
Environmental Health20054:17
DOI: 10.1186/1476-069X-4-17
©  Hindin et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2005
Received: 19 May 2005
Accepted: 26 August 2005
Published: 26 August 2005
http://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/artic...-069X-4-17

Quote:The health effects related to internal exposure may result from either chemical or radiological toxicity. Solubility determines the kind of toxicity exerted by uranium. The soluble forms of uranium are more associated with toxic chemical effects while insoluble forms are associated with radiological effects. Soluble chemical forms are absorbed within days while insoluble forms generally takes months to years to be absorbed [2]. DU is organotropic and has long-term retention in its target organs, to wit the kidney and the skeletal tissue. The biological retention capability of DU in bones enhances the particulate radiation to the target organs. Though the mechanism of action of DU oxides are not clear, biodistribution studies detail DU accumulation in the bone, kidney, reproductive system, brain and lung with verified nephrotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic properties, as well as reproductive and teratogenic alterations [14].

2.  Bleise A, Danesi PR, Burkart W: Properties, use and health effects of depleted uranium (DU): a general overview. Journal of Environmental Radioactivity. 2003, 64: 93-112. 10.1016/S0265-931X(02)00041-3.
View article:   http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/art...1X02000413

14.  Durakovic A: Undiagnosed illnesses and radioactive warfare. Croatian Med J. 2003, 44: 520-532.

Radioactive fallout leaves a dusting of heavy metals scattered to earth that are toxic to life.  Lead contamination is measured in parts per million, ppm, and considered dangerous at 3ppm.  Radioactive heavy metals are deemed safe when the radioactivity level drops to established safe levels.  The sailors were not given a lethal dose of radiation but they still seem to be suffering from heavy metal poisoning.
"The map is not the territory that it is a map of ... the word is not the thing being referred to."
 
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