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The Ocean is dying.
#1
I know the devastating effect that tritium has on aquatic species from the many studies done in the 60's and 70's.  Some field research has been done by pros and amateurs with extremely different results.  What about the other radionuclides the nukers have been dumping?  Stock and CodeShutdown think the answer may start with chitin.  Shameless promotion of a members website, see http://www.nukepro.net/search?q=chitin

We've tried to document the dying ocean in Biological Impacts

Life will be much harder for mankind without the bounty of the sea.
"The map is not the territory that it is a map of ... the word is not the thing being referred to."
 
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#2
Yeppers. It's been a terrible experience seeing more people pop and tell us with video reports that their part of the coast is bereft of the usual critters... starfish, seals, dolphins, whales, kelp, birds, flies... it isn't just the original watchers talking about decline of marine and coastal life.

Trouble is the media and agencies aren't tracking and reporting the event in any sort of systematic manner. There could be a reputable source listing, chronologically and geographically, all the deaths and declines, but, there is not.

We get these sporadic notices from a diverse selection of sources and no one is putting it all together for the big picture view. And, most blame the cause on climate change, red tide, toxic algae or otherwise say it's a mystery.... the scientists are stumped and baffled.
The fact is that impacts on marine life were noted as early as 2012. And, it's been snowballing ever since.

The great ocean die off would be a great data visualization project for computer savvy techies willing to tackle the mystery....
Pia
Jitsi chat: enfo.pia@gmail.com
 
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#3
Nukers continue to leak toxins with no concern for others who may want to go fishing.  Legal, permissible, safe releases we're assured yet we have Chernobyl spewage, Hanford seepage, Fukushima leakage, et al. Fukushima is the latest continuous insult and media studiously avoids the rad word.  

The Alaska oil spill showed us how devastating oil could be to nature, black ooze covering the wildlife.  The Gulf oil spill was handled by the lawyers and the press; we rarely saw the black ooze.  

Chernobyl was portrayed as hazardous because one of the other empires was to blame; the remediation was prompt and at great cost.  That empire faltered.  Fukushima was handled by the government and press of the western empire; declared safe so the empire's finances would not falter.  We wait for remediation because it's so difficult.  

Mankind's waste is creating a larger dead zone in the living sea.  Pia, the impacts on marine life were noted as early as the 60's bomb testing, snowballing since 2011.  The micro-plastics, the oil and chemicals, the radioactive tritium and many new radionuclides, all ended up in the sea but they don't want us thinking of that when we order fish for dinner.
"The map is not the territory that it is a map of ... the word is not the thing being referred to."
 
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#4
(07-16-2017, 12:34 AM)Horse Wrote: Mankind's waste is creating a larger dead zone in the living sea.  Pia, the impacts on marine life were noted as early as the 60's bomb testing, snowballing since 2011.  The micro-plastics, the oil and chemicals, the radioactive tritium and many new radionuclides, all ended up in the sea but they don't want us thinking of that when we order fish for dinner.

You are so very correct, Horse. We, the collective we, have allowed toxic waste to permeate our ecosystems far too long. And, people wonder why they get cancer, or their liver fails when they think they've led a health lifestyle... it's in the air, the water, the food we eat... we (humanity) are our own worst enemy.
Pia
Jitsi chat: enfo.pia@gmail.com
 
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#5
(07-17-2017, 09:49 AM)piajensen Wrote: We, the collective we, have allowed toxic waste to permeate our ecosystems far too long. And, people wonder why they get cancer, or their liver fails when they think they've led a health lifestyle... it's in the air, the water, the food we eat... we (humanity) are our own worst enemy.
I'm not so sure it's 'we' that are allowing anything.  'We' are being preyed on by a sub-species of humanity that feels no empathy or connectedness to a 'we'.  Greed, a need to control all others, they recognize each other and 'we' are only able to discern them through their actions.   Remaining hidden and deceptive to control those 'we' in order to delay the fury we unleash when enough of us become aware of the situation.  

Radiation poisoning kills slowly, each dose does damage to health.  The powers that be don't care who dies or what it costs to have nuclear bomb material.  Fuku radiation is continuing to kill ocean life.  Can't see that damage, but fish stocks are collapsing.  Three meltdowns and some evidence of recent fission events.  Adding insult to injury media keeps telling people how safe the radiation 'tainting' the environment is.  Look everywhere else but don't blame ionizing radiation because there's so many nuclear piles that could spew uncontrollably like Fukushima Daiichi.  Accidents and leaks happen; no easy way to fix it.  Until more people become aware of the very real damage that ionizing radiation is to our health and our food stocks the deceit will continue.
"The map is not the territory that it is a map of ... the word is not the thing being referred to."
 
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#6
(07-15-2017, 04:34 PM)piajensen Wrote: The great ocean die off would be a great data visualization project for computer savvy techies willing to tackle the mystery....

Not enough available data on ocean fish stocks to work with, it's a pretty big ocean.  Many catches go unreported, taken illegally.  Undesirable species are tossed back dead, unreported waste.  

How about the fish aquarium screensaver with the treasure box marked with a radiation symbol, every time it opens up the smallest fish disappears.  No new little fish, and the big fish eat each other, the last fish will be the smallest fish left in the tank, the box opens again and all the fish are gone.  A still, empty ocean view until someone wiggles a mouse and gets to work.
"The map is not the territory that it is a map of ... the word is not the thing being referred to."
 
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#7
I grappled with whether or not to use the collective we. Some of us have directly fought to stop nuclear projects and weapons. But, for me, this hasn't always been the case. In the 80s I was actively working against nuclear, but, then I withdrew to work to pay the bills. Others have worked against nuclear by organizing groups and they have continued to fight the good fight, but, it wasn't always so for them either.

We aren't born as anti-nuclear persons, there's a turning point. During the time before the turning point, we are, like most everyone else, concerned with fulfilling our personal needs and are not paying attention to where the electricity comes from, which politicians are receiving kickbacks from which industries, or where the nuclear waste is being dumped.

It is for that reason I chose to use the collective we. At some point in our lives, we weren't cognizant of the disaster growing in our communities. We paid the electric bills, but didn't question the source of the electricity. Had we all been more aware, we could have organized non-violent actions early on, before it all got so out of control. We could have refused to pay our electric bills en masse because we wanted safe energy. But, we didn't.

Now, we - you, I, anti-nuclear groups and members, and millions of people around the world are cognizant and active. But, there are still many more millions sleepwalking through the nuclear nightmare.

I really like your fish aquarium screensaver idea. That's a great way to send the message deeply into our psyche.
Pia
Jitsi chat: enfo.pia@gmail.com
 
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#8
P, not nitpicking, I only meant to use it to segue.  We all use the collective we all the time, see I just used it.  Probably shouldn't use the collective we though when talking about different groups of people having different agendas.  The small anti-nuke voice gets drowned out by a larger pro-nuke group and the rest follow along without thinking about it.  My father put the fear of radiation in me as a child, some things he'd seen in the Navy but couldn't talk about.  We, meaning you and I, have done some research and learned enough to take an anti-nuke stance.  We're trying to share that knowledge with other anti-nukers and to inform the rest of the people what the pro-nukers don't want the people to know about and for the most part they don't know enough to make an informed decision.  A small truth can topple many lies.  Even people that think need a reminder; I recently posted this comment to an article at SOTT.    

Why are Americans so sick?
Rishma Parpia
The Vaccine Reaction
Tue, 04 Jul 2017 21:48 UTC
https://www.sott.net/article/356424-Why-...ns-so-sick
Quote:Funny how everyone forgot to mention the increasing radio-toxins that Nuclear energy happens to be sharing with the world amidst all the other well known toxins.  Man-made radioactive elements are implicated in auto-immune disease.  Radioactivity is invisible to us, going unseen until we measure it.  Background radiation now includes man-made isotopes.  Were you ever downwind of a radiologic release?  Have you ever consumed radioactive contaminated food or water?  Yes, we are all receiving an additional radioactive burden that makes us sick.  

Quote:The prevalence of both autoimmune diseases and allergies has been increasing in the U.S. since the 1950s.10
The 1950's, when man started unleashing nuclear forces, creating and releasing new toxins.

Quote:The big question that remains unanswered is: Why is there such a lack of urgency by public health officials to investigate what is causing American children and adults to be so sick?
Nuclear energy is a military matter, don't ask too many questions.

You think an atomic aquarium screensaver might help get the word out?  Maybe I'll look into that, glad you liked it.
"The map is not the territory that it is a map of ... the word is not the thing being referred to."
 
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#9
Excellent point about 'we' and I do agree. We (aha) don't get enough exposure to the masses.

" Quote:
The big question that remains unanswered is: Why is there such a lack of urgency by public health officials to investigate what is causing American children and adults to be so sick?

Nuclear energy is a military matter, don't ask too many questions."

You called it.
Pia
Jitsi chat: enfo.pia@gmail.com
 
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