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Krypton-85 & Climate
#1
Collected from Majia and Paul Langley's blogs.

My take is that sufficient amounts of Krypton-85 were released (still being released?) to be of concern for climate scientists. Yet, I have yet to read anything about Fukushima's impact on climate from any of the most active climate change groups or persons.
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#2
via Maine's DoomsdayCW at twitter Krypton-85: How nuclear power plants cause climate change https://thesenecaeffect.wordpress.com/20...te-change/
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#3
@DoomsdaysCW  https://twitter.com/DoomsdaysCW on twitter

posting some great educational slides today 31 Oct 2015.
   
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#4
   
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#5
   
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#6
   
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#7
   
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#8
   
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#9
(10-18-2015, 12:24 PM)piajensen Wrote: My take is that sufficient amounts of Krypton-85 were released (still being released?) to be of concern for climate scientists. Yet, I have yet to read anything about Fukushima's impact on climate from any of the most active climate change groups or persons.

Pia, TY, The EPA had proposed a rule change early 2014 to limit the amounts of Krypton-85 allowed to be released.  Did EPA limit industry releases?  

Climate scientists are funded to promote global warming and have not looked at possible nuclear winter effects accumulating in the atmosphere from Daiichi's radioactive noble gas releases. The destruction of the ozone layer in the Antarctic was caused by atmospheric bomb testing. Since 2011, the ozone layer over the Arctic weakens.  Cosmic rays penetrate deeper and promote cloud formation.
"The map is not the territory that it is a map of ... the word is not the thing being referred to."
 
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#10
Exactly, great synopsis, H. Thank You.
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#11
Awesome! A chance to get Krypton-85 into scientific discussion? Grading Climate Articles http://climatefeedback.org/ On Krypton caferadlab.com/thread-168.html
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#12
We are now all on the Fukushima Fallout radar... a new, and dangerous?, climate change impact

Gigantic Gravity Waves to Mix Summer With Winter? Wrecked Jet Stream Now Runs From Pole-to-Pole https://robertscribbler.com/2016/06/28/g...e-to-pole/
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#13
Researchers with Sandia Labs study lightning's effects
http://www.pressenterpriseonline.com/apn...gs-effects

Excerpt:
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Researchers at one of the nation's federal laboratories are creating simulated lightning as part of an effort to determine how everything from nuclear weapon components to entire buildings will hold up to Mother Nature.

They're building upon what is already known about the physics of lightning to make sure the blast of energy released by a strike doesn't affect sensitive areas of a weapon, said Larry Schneider with Sandia National Laboratories' electrical sciences group.

"Sandia's primary mission is to assure an 'always/never' operating condition for nuclear weapons. They must work when authorized and never function otherwise," he said. "Direct strike lightning is a threat in the 'never' scenario."

Sandia's lightning simulator has been performing tests since the 1970s, but officials say the focus now is on improving the understanding behind lightning and the ways it interacts with various systems.

Researchers are looking at how lightning flows through lattices of rebar and what kind of electromagnetic forces are generated when protective wiring is exposed to currents that would be equivalent to a lightning strike, or as much as 200 kilo Amps.
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#14
(07-03-2016, 08:03 AM)piajensen Wrote: Researchers with Sandia Labs study lightning's effects
http://www.pressenterpriseonline.com/apn...gs-effects

Excerpt:
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Researchers at one of the nation's federal laboratories are creating simulated lightning as part of an effort to determine how everything from nuclear weapon components to entire buildings will hold up to Mother Nature.

They're building upon what is already known about the physics of lightning to make sure the blast of energy released by a strike doesn't affect sensitive areas of a weapon, said Larry Schneider with Sandia National Laboratories' electrical sciences group.

"Sandia's primary mission is to assure an 'always/never' operating condition for nuclear weapons. They must work when authorized and never function otherwise," he said. "Direct strike lightning is a threat in the 'never' scenario."

Sandia's lightning simulator has been performing tests since the 1970s, but officials say the focus now is on improving the understanding behind lightning and the ways it interacts with various systems.

Researchers are looking at how lightning flows through lattices of rebar and what kind of electromagnetic forces are generated when protective wiring is exposed to currents that would be equivalent to a lightning strike, or as much as 200 kilo Amps.

Pia, TY for finding and posting that tidbit.  Smile   Confirmation that direct strike lightning can trigger nuclear reactions.  The electrical storm in June could have stirred up the Daiichi fuel melts and caused the sparking and fogging we observed. I see a positive feedback loop; radioactive noble gases attract lightning; a direct strike induces more reactions and generates more gases. It's no wonder then that TEPCO tries to conceal lightning in the time lapse videos.
"The map is not the territory that it is a map of ... the word is not the thing being referred to."
 
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#15
So, there's a strange and disconcerting development in earth's atmosphere. Related to Fukushima radiation? Have to wonder. We do know that Krypton-85 has impacts on the atmosphere as demonstrated in the posts above.


Huge Hole in Earth’s ‘Detergent’ Layer Found Over Pacific By Andrea Thompson 14 April 2014
source: http://www.climatecentral.org/news/huge-...ific-17302

"It turns out the hole in the now famous ozone layer above the South Pole isn’t the only hole in the atmosphere. Researchers recently discovered, to their considerable surprise, that the atmosphere above part of the western tropical Pacific Ocean is nearly devoid of one of the key chemicals that scrubs pollutants from the air.

[Image: 4_14_14_Andrea__pacificclouds_500_335_s_c1_c_c.jpg] 
In tropical thunderstorms over the West Pacific, air masses and the chemical substances they contain are quickly hurled upward to the edge of the stratosphere. On the way, hydroxyl (OH) molecules "scrub" these substances from the air before it reaches the stratosphere, where they would be able to spread around the globe and would last for longer than in the lower reaches of the atmosphere. Except in a region of the tropical Pacific a hole in this OH "shield" has been discovered. Credit: Markus Rex, Alfred Wegener Institute                       

This newfound hole occurs naturally over thousands of kilometers in one of the most remote places on the planet (which accounts for its having gone unnoticed until now) and one of the main spots where air is sent up to the stratosphere. The stratosphere is the layer of Earth's atmosphere above the troposphere, the layer where humans live and in which most weather occurs. Having air shooting up to this layer without first being “washed” of all the junk that humans and nature put into the atmosphere has uncertain implications for the health of the planet’s protective ozone layer and its overall climate.

Marcus Rex, a climate scientist for the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research in Potsdam, Germany, stumbled onto the discovery of the hole while sending balloons with ozone-detecting probes into the atmosphere from onboard the research vessel Sonne far out in the Pacific. Probe after probe went up every 250 miles and returned the same puzzling result: The levels of ozone in the air column some 9 miles up — all the way to the stratosphere — were below what could be reliably detected by the instruments.

“I first suspected a series of false measurements and had to convince myself that the measurements were correct,” Rex told Climate Central in an email.


But the probes were right: There was barely any ozone throughout this huge chunk of the atmosphere. Without any ozone, there weren’t any hydroxyl radicals, a molecule made up of an oxygen and hydrogen atom (designated as OH) that is highly reactive in the atmosphere. This reactivity makes it an excellent “detergent” for cleaning from the air many of the thousands of other chemical compounds released by humans, other animals, microbes and plants. For this reason, the layer of OH that exists elsewhere in the troposphere is known as the “OH shield.”
“Only a few, extremely long-lived compounds manage to make their way through the OH shield,” Rex said in a statement.

But where the hole has been found, the air moving to the stratosphere (driven by warm sea surface temperatures, which help cause the air to rise) isn’t subjected to the OH shield and so can reach the upper layers of the atmosphere. The stuff that reaches the stratosphere can remain up there for years and spread around the globe.
[Image: 4_14_14_Andrea_OHhole_500_365_s_c1_c_c.jpg] 

The location and extent of the OH (or hydroxyl) hole over the western tropical Pacific Ocean.
Credit: Markus Rex, Alfred Wegener Institute 

Among the things that can reach the stratosphere through this hole are certain ozone-destroying compounds that contain the element bromine that could eat away at the planet's ozone layer, which protects life on the surface from the sun's harmful UV rays. This source of ozone-eating chemicals could account for the discrepancy that has been noted between measured ozone depletion rates in the stratosphere and what models suggested those rates would be, Rex and his colleagues said. However, the bromine compounds don’t pose a huge threat to the recovery Antarctic ozone hole, Rex said, since they need to be in the company of a lot of compounds that contain chlorine in order to destroy ozone efficiently, and such compounds (for example, chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs) have been mostly phased out by world governments.

“Since chlorine is expected to recover, there is only a small potential of the additional bromine to affect the recovery of the ozone hole,” Rex said.

But research still remains to be done to see the exact contribution of the OH hole to the ozone hole, as well as how it influences Earth’s climate. For example, sulfur-containing particles could be swept up to the stratosphere, where they could have a cooling effect by reflecting sunlight back to space. But the issue might not be so straightforward given the complexities of the atmosphere made clear by the discovery of the OH hole, Rex said.

“Since we just start to understand what is going on, it is not clear yet, how this ‘hole’ interacts with climate change and/or air pollution,” Rex wrote in an email."

RELATED
Ozone Hole Could Be on the Mend
Ozone Hole’s Shifting Winds May Sap Major Carbon Sink
Ozone Treaty Accidentally Slowed Global Warming: Study 
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#16
Horse shared this article at Higgins News Network.

Quote:Horse: The inert gases have electrical properties that are usually ignored because it won't kill people directly.  The vast amounts released should be compared to what was in the atmosphere as trace gases.  What does that do to weather in an electric universe?  Looking for non-linear effects; where a small change can have a big effect.  For example, a quartz crystal conducts electricity; but adding a trace amount of germanium, gallium, or arsenic turns quartz into an amplifier of electricity.  Imagine that bismuth, a stable heavy metal decay product has superconductive properties.
May 2015: Peer-Reviewed Study: Fukushima Xenon Radiation 2.5 Times Chernobyl http://www.alexanderhiggins.com/peer-rev...ernobyl-2/
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#17
via @microcarpa1 in twitter

onuma.cocolog-nifty.com/blog1/2017/01/bqbqbqbqbqbq-be.html#more … #Tepco data shows >41billion Bq of Kr85 gas still leaking f/ #Fukushima No.1 2air daily.
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#18
via @microcarpa1 in twitter

onuma.cocolog-nifty.com/blog1/2017/01/bqbqbqbqbqbq-be.html#more … #Tepco data shows >41billion Bq of Kr85 gas still leaking f/ #Fukushima No.1 2air daily.
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#19
@ HoTaters, Noticed your interest in Kr-85 and extreme storms, one of my interests too.  

Quote:Lescaudron, Pierre; Knight-Jadczyk, Laura (2014-05-22). Earth Changes and the Human-Cosmic Connection (The Secret History of the World) (Kindle Locations 2031-2035). Red Pill Press. Kindle Edition.
http://www.redpillpress.com/shop/earth-c...-volume-3/

Nuclear plants exhibit similar properties. They emit ionizing radiation which ‘scrape away’ electrons from molecules, creating positive and negative ions. [307] In the conductive plume, the negative ions are attracted to the top of the plume by the positive ionosphere, while the positive ions are attracted to the bottom of the plume by the Earth’s negative surface. The fact that nuclear plant plumes are mostly composed of water vapor, a good electric conductor, eases the ionic movement described above and the upward flow of free electrons from the ground to the top of the plume. On April 18th, 2013 the LaSalle nuclear plant in Illinois experienced an unusual incident: two of its reactors shut down and a radioactive venting procedure was carried out when it was struck by lightning.  However, from 1992 to 2003, U.S. nuclear plants were struck by lightning 66 times, yet none of those strikes caused equipment damage or radioactive leakage. [309]

   

So, what really happened in LaSalle? Was the accident simply due to an insulator defect, as claimed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), [310] or was the source of this ‘lightning’ something out of the ordinary? Nuclear plants are very well protected with lightning prevention equipment, [311] but cometary discharges exhibit two major differences when compared to ‘normal’ lightning bolts: their polarity is reversed [312] and their intensity can be much higher. The steady increase in cometary activity may cause more such events in the near future.

Good book with more on the Electric Universe theories, I bought the kindle version.  Plumes of water vapor are a good conductor; Krypton is an even better conductor.  Most lightning is negative but some lightning can be positive and 10X stronger than the negative.  Krypton-85, with its 10.8 year half-life, wasn’t in the atmosphere until the Atomic Age.  Bomb testing 60 years ago, most of it had beta decayed into stable rubidium.  Industrial NPP releases have been steadily increasing as more were put online and numerous accidents along the way were dumping this in the lower atmosphere instead of blowing it up into the upper atmosphere where it would spend some time decaying before falling on our heads.  Fuku was four big accidents and fuel melt blobs are still in an uncontained and unknown state.  In the early years I noticed lots of intense storms on the tepcams; fog, rain, and lightning.  Remember the red lightning; that was positive lightning.  As the plume spread over the northern hemisphere other areas began experiencing more extreme weather events.  The plume acts as a radioactive cathode to deliver a stronger charge to ground.  Charged particles from solar wind and upper atmospheric cometary dust loading find an amplified path to ground in the plume.
"The map is not the territory that it is a map of ... the word is not the thing being referred to."
 
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#20
North Korea Claims U.S. War and Nuclear Weapons Caused Climate Change http://www.newsweek.com/north-korea-us-w...nge-623825
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